panorama software,virtual tour software
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Joined: 2005-05-03
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2007-03-22
#1

Help with still images

Hi everyone,

First of all I would like to apologize for bringing this up in here as it have nothing to do with panoramas. Unfortunately I do not know where else to find the help I need.

I have an urgent need to learn the basics of still photography of buildings. Mostly inside but also some facade pictures.

I have the opportunity to land 2 architechts but they require that I also do still photos. Unfortunately I am a selv taught panoramic photographer strating from scratch and so far I have only focused on the workflow for panoramic pictures. I do not have the basic knowledge of photography as a "regular" photographer.

So my question / request is if someone can give me - or tell me where to find - basic insight on taking still photos of buildings etc.

The client knows a lot about photography and said they would like to see examples of a certain kind of photos. I believe he said something like "flash backlight" What is that? Does it mean shots where the attatched flash is the main light source?

I would also like to know what sort of equipment I should look for? My new camera will be a Canon 5D. Can anyone suggest a good flash and a suitable wide angle lense for interior shots?

I ask you fellow easypano forum members because I know that many of you also do tours for realtors. That must have given you a lot of experience with this kind of photos and I hope that I can learn the basics from you.

I would like to know tips and tricks on shooting. What equipment do you use? What is your work flow?

I am considering to use a tripod as I believe that will give me an advantage as I can use longer exposure times and have the opportunity for bracketing. Is this hwo you experienced guys do is? Or does it take to long to carry a tripod around?

I really appreciate all the response and advice you guys can give me.

Best regards

Morten 


Best regards

Morten Andersen
- a newbie trying to improve
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Joined: 2003-01-14
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2007-04-06
#2

I would recommend the Canon 580 flash and 16-35 f2.8 lens. This combination allows you to shoot most interiors handheld. A tripod is essential for low light or night shots. The 580 flash will also allow you to use another or other remote flashes when required. As this isn't really panoramic photography just email me with any further questions.

Simon 


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2007-04-06
#3

Hi Morten,

How soon do you need to submit the deliverables to your clients?

If you have a few weeks, then you need to learn as much as you can from the internet, books, etc. as fast as you can.  Armed with the info, you need to practice with your new gear.  That requires learning the camera features and accessories  ... including the tripod.  If you feel that the learning curve is too steep, then you might want to simply align with a pro photographer and have him take the stills for you while you do the panos.

As far as carrying the gear, I carry only two items:  a tripod case and a hard case.  The tripod case houses the tripod and the bogen action grip head.  The hard case houses the camera, lenses, panohead, and other items.  That's it.  Easy and convenient.

Good luck with your project and congrats!

r,
eagle


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2007-04-10
#4

Hi Simon

YEs I have also read that the 580 canon flash is the biggest. I think that is what I will get. But most times I think I would rather take multible exposures then using a flash. I feel more comfortable with this procedure.

Hi Eagle.

Yes I know the internet is a great place to learn. Can you recommend any good web sites? Or any good books? I really want to use my time as efficent as possible. I have also considered taking some lessons with a photographer. That is how I got started doing panoramas. Then I advanced by experimenting and reading up in here.

 


Best regards

Morten Andersen
- a newbie trying to improve
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2007-04-10
#5
Hi Morten,

I just did a quick google search on "basic photography" and found these:

http://photography.about.com/od/firststepsindigital/First_Steps_For_New_Digital_Photographers.htm

http://www.silverlight.co.uk/tutorials/toc.html

http://www.rosengren.net/photo/basic.htm

http://www.best-family-photography-tips.com/basic-photography-tips.html

http://www.digital-cameras-help.com/basic-photography-tips.html

Above should give you busy for a while. Heck, I'll probably go through them myself. I too try to soak as much info as I can.   When you think you know enough about something, you find or learn something new.

r,
eagle
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2007-04-12
#6

Hi Eagle

Thanks for sharing your input. I hope that you will learn a little as well from your search.

@Simon

You recommend th 16-35mm lense. I was actually considering the 17-40mm lense. DO you know the difference between these 2 choices?

 


Best regards

Morten Andersen
- a newbie trying to improve
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2007-04-12
#7

Hi Morten,
Think the 17-40 is good. I use a 16-35 simply as it is faster being a f2.8 and at 16mm, interiors look noticably bigger than at 17mm which is what my clients invariably want. Think it also performs slightly better on a 5d, less vignetting but this is less important to me.
 
Hope this helps

Simon


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2007-04-13
#8

Hi SImon

YEs I have also heard that many photographers doing tours of houses use the 16-35mm. But I must admit that part of the reason for choosing a 17-40mm is the big difference in the price. A 16-35mm is almost two times the price of a 17-40mm That is a big difference!!

 


Best regards

Morten Andersen
- a newbie trying to improve