panorama software,virtual tour software
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Joined: 2006-06-10
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Posts: 154
2008-02-04
#1

Panorama Lighting Equip.

Has anyone here experimented with professional lighting equipment for fisheye photography/virtual tour photography? A flash is obviously a no-go and AEB is ok most of the time, but what about some good quality lighting equipment? I realize that setting it up and moving it around as you pan around the room could be quite a challenge, but for some high-paying commercial jobs I think it could be worth the extra trouble IF it improved the overall quality of the pano. If you have any experience with this, what equipment are you using? I am looking into trying out a couple of continuous lights placed a few feet behind the camera pointing toward where the picture will be taken. I seem to run into some very challenging lighting situations from time to time and I just want to deliver the best quality possible.

What do you think?
Will Best
Virtual Impressions Inc.
Real Estate Virtual Tours and Floor Plans
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Joined: 2002-06-12
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2008-02-04
#2

Few years ago, a photographer did use a couple of Home Depot high powered work lamps.  He got reasonable success by bouncing the light off the ceiling...   meaning the light was diffused or spread across and down on the whole room with soft light.

Pointing the light in the direction picture was taken.. produced a bulls eye affect with hard shadows.


/s/
Dave
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EasyPano - Panoweaver
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Joined: 2006-06-10
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Posts: 154
2008-02-04
#3
I was thinking of something more like this on ebay - With the softboxes attached using 2 lamps pointing in different angles it seems as though you could have good even light distribution with minimal shadows... I have some work lights and I have tried that but that's not was I was thinking - Something like this that is geared toward digital video - Maybe I'll be the first to try when I get the extra money - anybody out there done this??? I'd like the lighting for video work eventually anyway...
Will Best
Virtual Impressions Inc.
Real Estate Virtual Tours and Floor Plans
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Joined: 2002-11-19
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Posts: 59
2008-02-05
#4
Suggestion: Before you spend your hard-earned $$$ on lightboxes, try a "dummy" experiment. Get two pole lamps (or two music stands or two tripods or two stools . . . ) as props and pretend they are your lightboxes. Now photograph four rooms of your home, setting up and moving the props for each shot. Remember that you will need to move the sync cords, power cords and extension cord or power pack(s) as well. My guess is that you will find this to be a very time-consuming task. It is unlikely that you will be able to increase your fees to cover the additional time required.
After you have completed this experiment with the props, if you are not unhappy with the extra time and hassle, there may still be "equal lighting/shadow" issues. So try to borrow or rent (or buy with "return privilege") a couple lightboxes and re-run your experiment, this time actually stitching the photos into tours. Examine the tours closely for unevenness of lighting/shadows. Good luck! Let us know your results.
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