panorama software,virtual tour software
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Joined: 2005-04-26
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Posts: 6
2008-05-08
#1

Lens Debate

I have an old Nikon D50 that I love and want to starting using it for the tour work. I cannot decide on what lens to get. I see so many posts suggesting the Sigma 8mm F4 EX DG, but for a Nikon D series wouldn't the AF DX Fisheye-Nikkor 10.5mm f/2.8G ED be better? That way you have a DX lens that is matched with the sensor size of the camera and experience to cropping.

All of this is speculation on my part as I have not done any pano work in some time and even then I was using an old CoolPix with the fisheye and adapter ring. The DSLR lenses are stumping me. Anyone have any comments or suggestions?

Thanks,

S Corwine
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Joined: 2007-08-13
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2008-05-08
#2
I get the idea of using the same manufactures equipment together, but what do you mean by "experience"?
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Joined: 2002-11-23
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2008-05-09
#3

The Sigma F4 EX DG 8mm Fisheye was replaced by the superior Sigma f/3.5 EX DG 8mm Fisheye quite some time ago now.

It really is not fair to compare apples with oranges.

Based on your camera....

The Sigma 8mm Fisheye is a circular fisheye and can cover a full 360x180 in 4 shots (*Drum) where as the Nikkor 10.5mm Fisheye is a full frame fisheye 180 degree diagonal and requires 8 shots to cover the full 360x180.

Yes, the Nikkor 10.5mm Fisheye will be somewhat better than the Sigma 8mm Fisheye in clarity and resolution but simply because it is a different style of lens and requires more shots.

If you do want to compare apples with apples you should be asking about the Nikkor 10.5mm, Tokina 10-17mm Zoom and the Sigma 10mm fisheye lenses all of which require 8 shots (6+TB) full frame at their widest settings.

The Sigma f3.5 8mm Fisheye is a better option for moving objects simply because it requires less shots to cover the full 360x180.

*Drum = A side cropped full circular image because of the 1.5x multiplying factor of the small sensor of the Nikon D50 DSLR. Reducing the width of the circular image by cropping of the side edges and reducing view from 180 degrees to around 140 degrees horizontal whilst retaining close to 180 degrees vertically when the camera is in portrait shooting orientation.

Regards, Smooth

 


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Joined: 2005-04-26
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Posts: 6
2008-05-09
#4
Smooth and Vince - thanks for the replies. Vince - sorry for the typo "experience THE cropping" - I am referring to the cropping that occurs on the horizontal plan due to the smaller sensor on the DSLR.

I most of the photography will be stills, real estate mainly, and taking the extra photos is not a big deal so I am leaning towards the Nikkor simply because being able to capture the full frame will allow my to use the lens for other photography projects.

Any other comments are most welcome!

Thanks,

S Corwine