panorama software,virtual tour software
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Joined: 2009-06-02
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2009-07-16
#1

Sigma 8mmF3.5 v Nikon 10.5 F2.8

Well, the Sigma is proving to be more expensive than the Nikon 10.5. I know the 10.5 is a little faster, if that is the correct term, so I don't see too many panos in low light.

I can get the Nikon 10.5 for $100 less than the Sigma 8mm F3.5

Aside from needing maybe 1 more photo in the circle, are there any other disadvantages of the 10.5 versus the Sigma 8?

I jut got off the phone with the guy I bought the D300 from and he said he has the Nikon 10.5 and did panos all the time and he thought the Sigma 8mm panos sometimes showed spherical aberrations, but I haven't noticed any although I am no expert.

Thoughts?

Thanks guys!
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2009-07-17
#2
I'm not sure it is fair to compare these to lenses in a competition style fight.

But, because these are still the most currently used lenses for panoramic work I'll happily talk about them.

First of the Sigma 8mm is a circular fisheye with a much wider FOV over the Nikkor 10.5mm full frame diagonal fisheye. Panoweaver looks at these images quite differently with the Sigma 8mm classed as "Drum" style and the Nikkor 10.5mm as 'Full Frame" style.

The Sigma 8mm fitted to a APS-C/DX small size sensor camera requires only 4 shots to cover 360x180 sphere. Where as the Nikkor 10.5mm requires (6+TB) or at a push (5+TB) reducing the overlap to very fine tolerances and creating more trouble than it's worth.

It is true the Sigma 8mm suffers from maybe a little more Chromatic Aberration but this is mostly because it is a wider lens in the first place. Either way, it is an easy fix during RAW processing. The Nikkor at f/2.8 is a slightly brighter lens but again this really isn't important when it comes to panorama shooting because you simply will not be shooting near this f/stop.

Both of these lenses are perfectly suitable for panorama shooting. The Nikkor is the superior lens by virtue of it requiring more images to complete the full 360x180 and thus the Sigma 8mm is a trade off of resolution vs the convenience of less required shots.

Remember we are talking 4 shots (Sigma) vs 8 shots (Nikkor) on the APS-C/DX small sensor camera bodies.

The Sigma 8mm panorama will have a maximum size of around 8000x4000 and the Nikkor 10.5mm around 11000x5500.

If you really wanted to compare lenses like for like then the Nikkor 10.5mm vs the Sigma 10mm vs the Tokina 10-17mm Zoom fisheye @10mm would be a better comparable match up as all are full frame fisheye's.

Possibly if money is the final deciding factor the Tokina 10-17mm Zoom Fisheye would be the clear choice as it is an excellent lens and far most useful because of the Zoom.

Oh! and of course we now have the Korean made Samyang 8mm Full Frame to choose from also!

Regards, Smooth
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2009-07-17
#3
Smooth, if the Tokina is a 10-17 fisheye zoom, that mean that is has the fisheye effect at all zoom levels?

I need to be able to take regular but very wide angle digital stills inside really small resort bungalows and even their bathrooms so prospective guests can see, so in the off chance a Tokina 10-17 could work both as a pano wide angle and a regular wide angle, that would really work out.
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2009-07-18
#4
Quote: Originally posted by EBMN on July-17-2009
Smooth, if the Tokina is a 10-17 fisheye zoom, that mean that is has the fisheye effect at all zoom levels?


The Tokina 10-17mm Zoom Fisheye remains a fisheye at all levels. Though, the effect is a lot less at 17mm. Like all wide angle or fisheye the images can be de-warped/de-fished with software.

Regards, Smooth
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2009-07-18
#5
Ok, thanks.