panorama software,virtual tour software
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Joined: 2002-06-22
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2003-01-18
#1

Lens Flare

Is there any way to reduce lens flare?
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Joined: 2002-06-12
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2003-01-19
#2

Hmmm well a sure fire way.. is don't point the lens into the sun.  But that is not always practical.

We also find that taking panorama's  in the shade of a building or a tree works real well.  Deliberately look for shadow areas to set up your tripod.

When we can't always get into the shady areas we use photoediting software to clone out lensflare affects.

Dave


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Dave
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EasyPano - Panoweaver
Pano2VR


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2003-01-19
#3

Hi all,

I take the point about reducing lense flare, but to be real, if you look up into the sun you get a bit of lense flare yourself.....so in affect it's more real to life!

I have often wondered if someone could make a polarizing (?) filter that was curved to cover the whole of a fish eye lense? Maybe even if it was stand alone and covered more than the lense could see? Any thoughts?????

Regards, Smooth


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2003-01-19
#4

Hmmm interesting idea.  

Nikon's approach to a fisheye lens circular polarizer is to stack the CP filter between the native and fisheye lens.  Their whole filter set has bi-sided 28mm diameter threads

To see the filters and sample images point your browser to:

http://360texas.com/tips/filters.htm

Hope this helps

Dave 


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Dave
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2004-05-13
#5

I have tried to use this polarizing filter and it proved useless for fisheye VR images. The reason being that, by nature of it being there, moves your fisheye lens farther away from the camera, so the resultant circular image is not only smaller, but less than 180-degree FOV. I was also very un-impressed with how "loose" it felt... made the lens wobble a bit.

Flares can be a pain, even when shooting indoors if your seam crosses over a bright light or window. The flare artifact is usually seen 180 degrees out of phase with the light source on your circular image. So if the sun is at the 2:00 position on the edge of your fisheye circle, the flare will appear at the 8:00 position respectively. (so your flare will only last for 6 hours! )

Typically what I like to do is take 1 "junk shot" just for the purpose of setting the Auto Exposure lock on the CP4500. I'll intentionally orient the camera such that the sun or "bright spot" falls on the very edge of the fisheye image, letting the exposure "lock" to the mid-tones of the scene. Then I'll rotate the camera about 90 degrees or so to capture the 2 "real" images for the pano. This typically helps me keep flares to a minimum.

Cheers,

Brian


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2004-05-13
#6

hi brian,

based on your tip, the first "real" image will be shot facing the bright spot and the 2nd real image will be shot facing the opposite direction. did i get it right?

thanks,

vt


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2004-05-13
#7

Hi VT,

Depends on the lighting situation, but sometimes yes. Usually I'll just rotate the tripod stem around a few degrees so that the brightest spot of the fisheye image is OFF of the seam (edge). In my experience, the "junk" shot (with the brightest spot at the edge) just locks the exposure to the average levels of the space. Rotating the camera a few degrees AFTER taking the junk shot just helps prevent or minimize lens flares.