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2006-02-26
#1

Stitching 1 hemi for print use

Hi all - and perhaps especially Rudders UK

I want to use my fish eye lense to take a wide angle picture I have to use for a flyer I am making for my girl friends hair saloon. I stitch the picture with panoweaver 3 and it looks really great. BUT it is only 72dpi. Not very suitable for a print job.

Anyone know if I can change the settings in panoweaver 3 so it is not 72dpi??

Best regards

Morten Andersen

- a newbie trying to improve


Best regards

Morten Andersen
- a newbie trying to improve
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2006-02-26
#2

Hi Rudders

This helped a lot.

I do have photoshop, and I even have a neat little program for resizing.

Thanks for the input


Best regards

Morten Andersen
- a newbie trying to improve
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2006-02-26
#3
It really shouldn't matter to the software that you are using to do the layout for print. As long as you use a large image file as the origninal, it should look fine.

The 72 is acutally pixels per inch, which is not exactly the same as dots per inch (dpi).

From Wikipedia:

A digital image captured by a scanner or digital camera has no inherent "DPI" resolution until it comes time to print the image (and even then, a more accurate measurement of image resolution is pixels per inch); for example, a 1000 x 1000-pixel image could be printed at 44 inches and 250 pixels per inch, or at 10 x 10 inches and 100 pixels per inch. Digital images contain some number of pixels; the size at which they are printed is relatively arbitrary. When someone asks for a "300 DPI image", they may be expecting an image with 300 pixels per inch of printed output; unless the size of the printed output is known beforehand, the measurement is meaningless. A more complete specification would include the desired print size in addition to the number of desired pixels per inch. A yet more complete specification would also include the DPI capability of the printer that will be used to print the image; if the printer is only capable of faithfully reproducing 100 pixels per inch, there is no reason to use a higher-resolution image.


John


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2006-02-26
#4

Hi John

 

Thank you for clearing that for me. I helped a lot, so I can finish the flyer.

 


Best regards

Morten Andersen
- a newbie trying to improve
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2006-02-26
#5
Hi Morten

If its any easier for you, work it out as:

1000 x 1000 pixels = 85mm x 85mm (approx @ 300 dpi)

So, say you have a pano 6000 x 3000, that will give you a very good quality print approx 50 cm x 25cm (@300dpi)

If you use photoshop just open your pano then go to image size - click OFF resample image, then put resolution to 300 pixels/inch. this will resize the pano suitable for print.
then you can mess around with the size in mm/cm etc to the suitable size you require.

If you dont have photoshop you can still use the above to work out the approx size of it on your leaflet layout.

Some people think that as modern inkjet printers print up to 5760 etc dpi that the need to have their image this size. This is not the case. for everyday or even professional printing, 300dpi will be plenty for full colour images.

Mono images such as lineart/clipart & text should be 600dpi for best results on small print.

If you wish to print images large then you can lower the resolution, in turn this will increase the size of the image. For example we will print large posters / canvases with image resolutions of 200 dpi as they are more likely to be viewed from a distance so dont need to be so high res.

Hope this helps.
Regards