panorama software,virtual tour software
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Joined: 2002-05-23
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2006-03-08
#1

Nikon D series

Hey guys,

I am getting more into studio work than I was before, and have a major question. I have just purchased a new Fuji Picrography 4500 photo printer. With the machine costing over $6000, I want to make sure I am also using the best digital camera available. I currently have the 8mp CP8700 that I use for my online photos and virtual tours.

My question: How much of a difference is there between the CP8700 on a high end printer than there would be with a D series camera on the high end printer? The printer is capable of printing at 400dpi

I guess what I am saying is: Do I realy need to buy the D series? Will the difference only be minimal? Is it a "status" symble more than anything to be able to tell my clients I have the best camera available?

I kinda got pushed in this direction. My kids go to a private Christian school that has around 400 students. I operate their website and volunteer as often as possible. The school dean asked me last week to take on the job of shooting all student photos and athletic photos. I can setup at the school with my mobile studio stuff and sell around 350 $30 packages within a day...Nice problem to have, but I want to make sure I am ready.

Thanks for any help. Kris


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Joined: 2005-05-15
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2006-03-13
#2

Hi zjoker,

When it comes to "printing" photos is all about megapixels. The more megapixels the larger the image is dimensionally. All the images from a camera will be at 300dpi. So this means the more megapixels the image has the larger it is dimensionally.

And this means you can print out a larger print at good quality. You can always go smaller and retain full quality but you can not go up in size without loosing quality. So the more megapixels you have the larger you print can be.

The camera has nothing to do with the printer in terms of quality. First consider what your capturing on the camera then consider the output device.

Your camera is quite capable of doing what you need in quality but you really need to consider  the camera requirments for this kind of job.

Idon't think the 8700 is up to the job. You going to need lighting and a good lens. You will need to slave the lighting to the camera and calculate exposure correctly. You will need a fast response time in shooting with instant focus if you subjets are moving at all and a good speed light for the camera.  You basically need a "Portrait rig".

A good DSLR is definitly in order. Either a D50, D70 or Canon 20D or the other Canon models. Plus a high quality lens of say 17 - 55 mm or perhaps an appropiate prime lens. Of course if you have the money you could go for someting like a Canon 5d or a Nikon D2X. I would pick the Canon 5d because it is a full fram CMOS sensor.

General Lee

 


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Joined: 2005-09-16
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2006-03-13
#3
Well anecodtally the d50 is the cheapest and the most bang for buck. Only 6mp compared to your 8 but should be a cleaner image and you should be able to get up to a3 but perhaps not at the 400dpi your printer can do.

Some fans rave about the fuji s3 pro for portraits and skin tones but noone likes using it that much it would seem.

The best regulary available camera money can buy is the Canon EOS 1Ds Mark II with full frame and 16mp. Some people say the previous model the 1ds 11mp is better (and cheaper second hand) than the newer 5d. The advantage of full frame is a cleaner image and it should be easier to get a narrow depth of field were the person is in sharp focus but the background is blury.

I depends partly on if athletics means fast action shots in which case you probably want a nikon.

That said the best compromise between loads of money still getting good quality is probably the new canon 30d.

But as I said its anecdotal and remember you will then have to budget for lens, something really sharp for your portraits and something longer for you athletics.
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Joined: 2002-05-23
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2006-03-14
#4

Thanks for the replies guys.

When I said athletics, I actually meant studio portrait shots, but I welcome all the advice on action shots. I actually have a bid on the D2x on ebay right now, so I was leaning that way too. The athletic shots will be taken in the school gym with large skylights providing the natural light, so I am not sure how long it will take to get my lighting setup for portrait shots. The best part of it is that they will not be very picky with the quality of work, but as a professional, I want to be providing the best.

I want to make sure I have the best quality camera and lens for a perfect 8x10 and smaller. I have all the lighting issues taken care of. I have the slave flashes setup to run off the camera flash remotely, and has worked pretty well.

I would like to find a cord to run to my laprop so the photo subject can view the images taken of them before leaving the photo shoot. Any advice there?

Thanks, Kris


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Joined: 2004-11-09
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2006-03-15
#5
Nikon 'capture control' software will allow you to connect your camera direct to the laptop, to review images as you take them, as well as tons of other stuff such as time delay photography. Obviously you would need a Nikon camera too. Not sure what Canon have to offer.
aj
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Joined: 2005-07-07
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2006-03-15
#6

Hi there

Ajay - do you mean this lets me connect my cam to my ultra portable, see the image I'm about to take and tweak the cam setting (therefore using the much larger laptop screen) or does this work with ones I have just taken?

Sounds a very useful thing...

F


sales@actualeducation.co.uk
www.actualeducation.co.uk
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2006-03-16
#7
okay..so If I go with the d50 or d70 (what would you advise on those 2?)...and considering I am only using this camera for studio work. Subjects only10-15 feet away..would I need a special lens other than say the 18-55mm?
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2006-03-19
#8

The stock 18-70mm lens that comes witht he Nikon D bodies is crap. At 18 mm is has barrel distortion and at around 50mm it causes some "roundness" of portrait subjects. And it doesn not produce good quality when shot at large apertures (below F8). It is a cheap prodcution model meant to get people started right out of the box. It's not a lens for portrait work.

Some portrait photographers use a zoom lens so that they can get farther away from the subject to reduce the inherint "roundness" distortion that occurs with close up portaraits. Getting back 15 feet or so make the image a little "flatter" and renders the subject in a more flattering perspective. It also gives you choices on subject distance and framing. But if you go this route you shoud get a really good lens.

Then there are the studio photographers who use several cameras each equipped with an appropiate "prime" lens. Usually 3 cameras. Each with a different lens.

A "prime" lens will always give a sharper image. But you are limited to a narrow subject distance depending on the lens focal length.

As has been said here before......."It's all in the glass baby".... Like everyting it seems "you get what you pay for" in lens.

In my opinion the lens is what makes the difference between really sharp good photos and those that are "acceptable"

If I had to choose a setup I would go for the affordable camera and spend the money on a good lens.

General Lee

 


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2006-03-20
#9

thanks Gen Lee.

I decided on the d50..for the price, I had to make that choice. Your opinion on the sigma 24-70mm f2.8...?

I would also welcome advice on the best VT equipment to go with the d50.