panorama software,virtual tour software
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Joined: 2003-03-06
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Posts: 58
2003-03-06
#1

Output Resolution Considerations

Hi all,

This is my first posting.  I just bought Panoweaver Standard and PTVierwer Scripter.  I am using a Nikon 995 with the FC-E8 fisheye converter.

If someone can give me the procedure to get the best pans to reasonably stream over the internet I would be greatful. I figure the least amount of compression as possible is best and I don't want to do a double compression on any images if possible.

1) When stitching the images, there is an image size choice.  Should I use a larger size to get the best image and then reduce the compression when saving or  publishing the pans? 

2) After stitching the pans and when I want to save or publish them, I need to choose the Jpeg Quality setting.  Should I go with the default 75% setting or do a comparision?

3) Is there another compression in PTViewer Scripter? 

Thanks,

Tom


www.go360media.com
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Joined: 2002-11-23
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2003-03-07
#2

Hi Tom,

I use the CD 3000x1500 setting for publishing the final stitched image and then save as .bmp.

Open the .bmp in Photoshop 7.0, Sharpen once and choose Save for Web and then resize to 1400x700 and in two window mode view the compressed image until I feel it views fine and is at the smallest compressed .jpg file size. Typically around 100-180kb

I always leave the original image saved as a .bmp for future work etc. Like you might want to place on a CD or view it locally off the hard drive.

If you do not have Photoshop 70-80% commpression would be about correct.

I also will recommend a program I use called "Jpeg Wizard" show you compression as it happens. Great for making images as small as possible for web viewing without losing viewing quality.

Hope this helps, Smooth  


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Joined: 2003-03-06
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Posts: 58
2003-03-07
#3

Thanks Smooth, I'll give it a try and take a look at "Jpeg Wizard" too.  This sounds like a great way to control the compression.

Tom


www.go360media.com