panorama software,virtual tour software
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2003-05-28
#1

Outdoor lighting - indoors!

Hi there!

I need help please!! I currently use the nikon coolpiks 4500. My problem is when taking pictures indoors I always get a unatural glow from light coming in through windows and glass doors. I use the manual expoxure setting, with AE locked, I have tried every setting actually, over exposing and under exposing but to no avail! I just want the lighting coming in the room to look natural and not have a "white glow". Any suggestions? Please?

Thank you!


DJ McKim
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2003-05-29
#2

Hmmm do you have a demo page we can look at?? URL please.

 

Dave


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Dave
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2003-05-29
#3

Well I have the same problem since you have the same exposure all around but there are some great differences between ligh from window and in the room.

This is how I try to work around that problem. I set AE lock also (using nikon 995  but should be the same) and face the window so I would get the least over exposure from the window. This will result in very dark parts in the picture where no windows are.

I then go into Photoshop and duplicate the layer and set the layer to multiply negative (i don't know if thats what its called in english). This will lighten the whole picture. Dark parts and window. I then repeat this and make a copy of the second layer which will lighten the whole thing even more.

Then I cut out the windows on layer 2 and 3 so that parts are not made lighter by the prozess.

An example of one tough shot is herehttp://wagner.panoramas.ch/homecinema/homecinema.htm

Sorry for my english. If you can not follow what I will make a flash tutorial to show you how I do it.


Nikon D70s, Sigma 8 mm, 4 to 12 shots, Agnos MrotatorTShort, PTGui, PS CS3, and lots of other software :-)
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2003-05-29
#4

Just one little note

That's how I try to get rid of the overexposure. I did not say it works


Nikon D70s, Sigma 8 mm, 4 to 12 shots, Agnos MrotatorTShort, PTGui, PS CS3, and lots of other software :-)
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2003-05-30
#5

Thanks for your help -  I do have a good sample, but you have to navigate through a couple of scenes first, click on the office hotspot then the shop hotspot, You will notice the white "unnatural glow" in the big bay door windows. I just want them to look like they would to the human eye! Much appreciated mates!

http://stpvirtual.com/AVM5/avm.htm


DJ McKim
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2003-05-30
#6

Hi djames,

I walked through your shop, office and outside. BRRRRRR darn cold looking.  If you are talking about the VIEW through the front entrance door next to the apparent entrance.... I don't think you have an issue. That is what I would get with my 990.  Considering your site temperature looks about 32 deg below zero.

Its 90F 33C degrees here near mid summer. Company swiming pool water temperature is 85 and climbing.  While I dabble my feet in the pool.. please explain to me 'Which Window' look unnatural??

Yes, we really would like to help.. but need more information concerning your camera settings at the time you took the shot through the business entrance.  Good source of that type information is to look at the nikon info.txt file to see your EXIF data.

Dave


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2003-05-30
#7

Thanks alot Dave!

 

I meant the windows in the shop tour, the big bay windows, they are white glowing, I really aprreciate your help!

Thanks again!


DJ McKim
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2003-05-30
#8

ok.. I walked in from the outside into the reception area.  Then clicked and went into the 'shop'.  If you are talking about the bay windows up near the ceiling level, the excessive light coming through them is causing what is called "Burn out".  This is typical of unbalanced dark indoor/ bright outdoor light sources.  The glow you are seeing is really only 'over exposure' areas. [could be the Snow Gods looking in].

Your camera image exposure is set for the lighting conditions inside the shop area.  If you set the camera exposure value down 1 stop  like from F2 to F8 that would allow a balanced lighting from the windows but would make the interior of the shop.. darker.  Unfortunately, I don't know a workaround other than to manually tell the camera to make the lens iris abit smaller by going up to F8. 

OR you might consider adjusting the EV setting to minus value -.3 or more. That would make the image darker.. and probably remove the windows burn out due to the overexposure light glare.

Not much help this time.


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2003-05-31
#9
Thanks heaps Dave! I really appreciate your help!
DJ McKim
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2003-05-31
#10

That's what I tried to explain.

Another thing would be to have a cubic stiching and just go into PhotoShop and replace the window with extra shots taken without fisheye.

Nothing Photoshop cant fix.

 


Nikon D70s, Sigma 8 mm, 4 to 12 shots, Agnos MrotatorTShort, PTGui, PS CS3, and lots of other software :-)
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2003-06-01
#11
Here is how to fix this problem for real. If you _really_ want to have a normal exposure through the windows AND inside the shop, you will need to make a HDR (high dynamic range) panorama. It involves a bit more work, but gives impressive results, with nicely exposed windows and shadowed regions. I have been experimenting with this lately using a new application named Photomatix.

http://www.multimediaphoto.com/photomatix/

You shoot fisheyes at normal exposure, overexposed and underexposed (even more than one level of under and over exposure if you want to make things even better. I use a Nikon 995 and use auto-bracketting to take pics at ev+2, ev+1, ev 0, ev-1 and ev-2 in a manual exposure mode (not as hard as it sounds.) I take all five at one position before moving to the next angle (using three fisheye angles to make a pano). Yes, this means I take fifteen pictures total. I then stitch a pano for each exposure value, starting with the "normal" ev 0 exposure. For the other exposures, I do a manual stitch (have to have the Pro version of Panotools for this, I think) for each of the other panos, setting everything from cropping circles to yaw/pitch/roll to the exact same values I got for the normal exposure. This helps to insure that everything is lined up the same in each of the five panoramas.

Ok, so I have had to stitch five panos instead of one, a fair amount more of work (wish I could afford the batch version of panoweaver!) Let's look at each of the five panos (hope my links work!) Note that all of the images have been reduced to 25% in size and saved at 60% jpeg quality. I do all of my work using uncompressed images until the final panorama. (These were shot in my family room to test out the HDR photography concept, so pardon the mess.)

First the most underexposed (ev-2), to get the brightest parts of the windows and lights under control:


Next, the ev-1 for less-blown-out highlights:


The normally exposed image, exposure found using the meter on the LCD of the camera with manual exposure, with a bright window on the periphery of the scene:


The slightly overexposed image (ev+1):


The very overexposed image (ev+2) which brings out details in the shadows:


Now look at two combinations of these images made using Photomatix. It has several levels of combining images that trade off speed, quality, and "feel". Here is the result of the fastest combination, which takes a couple of minutes:


Here is one of the using the advanced-light method, which takes around 15 minutes (You mileage may vary). Honestly, it doesn't seem terribly different from the fast one to me:


Here is a color corrected version. I did the color correctin using the iCorrect Editlab Photoshop plugin.




I think you can see that the highlights are no longer blown out, nor are the shadows as dark. In a critical situation, this could really improve an important pano. Here is a link to the final panorama in QuickTime format. I used CubicConverter to convert the pano to a cubic QTVR:
Pano with no color correction
Pano with color correction
You may notice that I ended up with a bit of a blue cast on one hemisphere of my panorama