panorama software,virtual tour software
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Joined: 2002-04-29
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2003-06-02
#12
Hi djames,

     "A little extra attention to detail" Page three if you set your forum browser to look back at the last six months. Dated March   8th. Try reading this thread I started and see if this method works for you. It has a few less steps than Johns method. I was stitching two hemishere panos and Phoenix was stiching three pano hemispheres. Phoenix's method makes more sense.... taking a full on( over exposer of your windows) as the primary light source and than duplicating with the other shot and exposing for the view out your window. Old style shooting two panos was to place your primary light source on the seem. This would place an equal amount of light from primary light source in both your hemispheres. The rules changed with three hemis.
      Also a rule of thumb is to remember that outdoor light
is cool/blue hue or 5600k..... 5600 degrees kelvin. Indoor
incondesant lighting (average light bulb) is a warmer cast 3200k. So if you white balance your camera and choose an outdoor or cloudy setting for indoor shooting and the indoor lighting is overpowering the light filling the room from the window you will get an orange or very warm interior shot with the view out the window being the correct hue or color temperature. But the view out the window in this case is not the primary concern...a correctly exposed white balanced interior is.
      The reason for the overly orange hue is because you chose your white balance filter un- wisely grasshopper. Because you should have chosen the incondesent interior filter as it was your predominant light source. It is a balancing act. The work around is to shoot your interior exposed hemi with the incondesent setting then shoot your next exposure( for the window) white balanced for cloudy out doors. This will throw the rest of the interior almost to black. Don't be alrmed because your not using that portion of the hemi ..... your just going to mary correctly exposed window portion with that of the correctly exposed interior shot. This will give you a correctly exposed interior shot color temperature correct and it will give you a correctly exposed winow view also correctly white balanced without the blue cool 5600k hue. Like I said it comes from a bit more effort and "a little extra attention to detail"
    Hope this helps and doesn't make it as clear as mud!!!

Jack    



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Joined: 2002-11-23
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2003-06-02
#13

Hi Guys,

First thank you John for pointing this software out, I have downloaded the trial. Seems pretty simple to use after following the online tutorial.

Jack, I have just "bumped" your topic "A little extra attention to detail" back into the lime light so others can read it.

Thank you everyone who is sharing.

Regards, Smooth


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2003-06-04
#14

I did donwload the trialversion too and gave it a shot. This is what I did and found out.

I took 3 FE shots of my office (don't tell anybody about the mess you will see)

First set Exposure Fixed on my Nikon 990 and took first shoot against the window with Exposure setting -2.0

Then took same shots with exposure setting +2.0

So I would get one shot with best window view, and one with best of the rest view.

I did then use the photomatix to have a autocorrected and one with more effort on setting light (about 6 minutes)

I also took the under exposured pano to Photoshop triplecated the layer and set the setting to mulitply negative (once again I am not sure what's it called in the english version. but you can test it. just duplicate any layer and play with the settings of the layer one will make it brighter one will make it darker) and then cut out the window parts of the 3 added layers so only dark parts of the picuture will be made lighter and the windows remain what they ware.

Here is what I found out.

Photomatix works fine, if: the shoots you are using are aligned properly. Otherwise it will result in quality loss. You will see my quick and dirty thest later.

For me the PS solution has some advantages. Need to take only 1 set of pictures. No problems about having 3 panos exactly the same to match.

See the example here http://www.besichtigung.ch/tests/photomatix

If I had to take pnao as perfect as it would get, I would make sure that the tripod is fixed very hard and would use a external shutter release to have the shots the same as possible, stich them first and take them to photmatix to fix.

But beeing a 80/20 guy. That's a lot of work. So I doubt I will use it very often.

This just brings me up to something. Anyone ever tried to have a extra light source under the tripod to get more light inside a room?

Maybe a car battery and lamp could be a good work around for shoots with various light sources or for dark rooms.

Dave will probably thinks of something.


Nikon D70s, Sigma 8 mm, 4 to 12 shots, Agnos MrotatorTShort, PTGui, PS CS3, and lots of other software :-)
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Joined: 2002-09-24
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2003-06-04
#15

Markus,

I think the Photoshop panos looked great. I will save my money and just use PS.

Scott


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2003-06-05
#16

msb2002

The first Photoshop fix was from just one underexposured pano. The fix took me about 2 min to make. For me an under exposed picture is 10 times easier to enhance then an over exposed.

Under exposed has details just not visible. Over exposed has no details.

If you look at the bothom of the bookshelf to the right of the window front you will see that it gets a bit "dirty". This is because I copied the background layer 3 times and aplied "lighten" to all copied layers.

Thats why I tried it another way.

one layer is the under exposed pano. Second layer on top is overexposed. Then I cut out the windows from the over exposed layer and can now use the slider to change the transparancy to what I want.

Got better results of color this way and less "dirt" at the bottom of the bookshelf. In order to doo this you have to have two sets of shots. (under and over). So I will allwas make sure to get many variations of exposure upon taking such panos.

Once again I think photomatix is a great product but needs 100 % good work befor using it.

 


Nikon D70s, Sigma 8 mm, 4 to 12 shots, Agnos MrotatorTShort, PTGui, PS CS3, and lots of other software :-)
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2003-06-05
#17

Markus,

Thanks for the info It will help alot.

Scott


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2003-06-06
#18
Thank you all for your input! It is greatly appreciated!
DJ McKim