panorama software,virtual tour software
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Joined: 2003-01-24
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2003-08-01
#1

Continous lighting

Has any one every used an external light sort - light a spot light, that you would have behind you for one hemisphere then move behind you for the other hemi, would that work with your AE locked? -  I am finding that I am getting a yellow glow as a result of poor indoor light sources- too much saturation. Any thoughts?

Cheers from Canada!


DJ McKim
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Joined: 2002-06-12
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2003-08-01
#2

No I can't say I have tried that type of lighting approach. 

However, If you are taking images indoors, it is not difficult to turn on a few table lamps, ceiling lights and close the draped windows... and our Nikon 990 will compensate quite nicely.

What type of camera and actual scene are you talking about?

Dave


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Dave
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Joined: 2003-07-17
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Posts: 63
2003-08-01
#3

If you have a problem with colour casts and you have Photoshop, using image adjustment layers should be able to rid you of it.

If it's something you're not familiar with, go to www.luminous-landscapes.com for a very good tutorial on how to get started and understand the tricks Photoshop is capable of.

Hope this helps

Neill Watson


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Joined: 2003-01-14
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2003-08-01
#4
Have experimented with photographic lights, slow sync flash etc but have found it difficult (impossible) to produce an even illumination from floor to ceiling. Don't think there is a solution that would be quick to set up each time for each hemisphere. If the camera can't compensate adequately for low light, photoshop normally comes to the rescue. 
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Joined: 2003-01-16
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2003-08-03
#5
I've had some success with a flash light bouncing off a white cealing...
mind u... not to use as a hemisphere... rather as one of the shots I take to cut certain elements out of to then use as a photoshop layer. I've only experimented with this a few times... once for a bathroom showroom... I got quite good results as some of the elements were therefore well lit. These were later layered as mentioned and gave the resulting image further depth. Alas having server problems so can't give u a link... but this'll be sorted soon and I'll post an example.
Otherwise... I find that my cp990 is quite capable of dealing with a wide variety of lighting conditions. I prefer to take a series of shots, each .3 higher lower then the last. I then tend to have a base hemi and layer in elements from the other shots... blown out windows is a classic example... the odd dark corner or blown out lamp is the other.

If I only had an hour to chop down a tree... I'd spend 45 mins sharpening the axe.
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Joined: 2003-08-01
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2003-08-18
#6
I've been doing several tests taking indoor dark shots with lighting.  I will let you know how they turn out when I perfect it.  So far, they are comming up pretty good.
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2003-08-19
#7

One thought comes to mind.. but take a bit of photoshop post processing is to use the EV setting -.3 or -.6.  Set your camera to AE LOCK.  Then shoot the 2 or 3 images.  Go ahead and stitch the images even though they are dark.

Then take them into photoshop.. and use the marquee with a 4? feather border around the bright windows or white spot.. then SELECT INVERSE (that selects all but the bright windows) and then use  IMAGE Adjustment | brightness to bring up the lighting for all other areas excluding  the bright window.

You may use mulitlple bright windows or hot spots in this process.

Its not difficult.. just give it a try.

Dave 


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