panorama software,virtual tour software
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Joined: 2009-08-30
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Posts: 64
2009-10-27
#1

Overexposure


hello Smooth:

I am having problems with overexposure in my images, I ve been reading through internet some tutorials. I d like to make you
two questions about it:

1. Navigating through internet I ve found some small tutorials, that talk about if the image is overexpose and you want to fix it,
"they replace the sky with another image, using layers in photoshop" I thought this was a great idea to fix  overexposure, I did it on 2 of my images
(I replace the sky), I think they look good, I also read that doing this I should adjust the brightness, curves, shadows etc, so the image looks more
 real, as if the picture was shoot in real. The only problem I have is that I cant get it in fixing the edges of the image after replacing the sky, it
looks like the images color blends as I place the layer above the original image and it causes a strange edge in all the image, that I cant get rid of it.

Ok, now I have a client that needs a panorama of a farm, ranch, and the problem is that always in this area
is very cludy in these days. So I was thinking in replacing the sky, not for a sunny sky of course, but for a bright and clear sky, just in
case the image get overexposed.   With your experience, Do you think it is a good idea to do this ??? Or may be I should leave the image just like it is, and
fix the brightness, aberration color, curves etc. with photoshop ???????


2. I would like you to tell me please , if these steps I do to shoot, are ok, :

a. I prepare the rotator, level tripod etc.

b. Position the camera in front of the object

c. I turn the Camera Control dial up and down in order to find the correct exposure, For example, today was a very sunny day, and the first image (0 degree) was
shoot, the Av , changed in the 3 images I shoot, Im getting guide through the " exposure level indicator"  I always try to keep  a (green line ) in the middle
because, too much up or down get red, and I think it is why it get overexposed.

I now found that my camera has a * AE lock button, that the manual says that this is button is effective when the contrast is too strong between the
subject and background or when a subject is backlit.

By other side: the manual also says:

pressing the shutter button halfway and  pressing the * AE lock button, will lock the exposure setting.

So do you think I am doing this right to avoid overexposure or what do you think about the sky replacement in photoshop ????????


Thanks


Regards, Sal
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Joined: 2002-11-23
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Posts: 5438
2009-10-28
#2
Quote: Originally posted by salvador on October-27-2009
hello Smooth:
With your experience, Do you think it is a good idea to do this ???

No, it is no substitute for the actual real thing unless you are a well trained Photoshop expert. Rarely are these successful by amateurs. People can tell and even if they don't know exactly what was done the image still looks odd because of un-matching shadowing and light fall.

Regards, Smooth
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Joined: 2002-11-23
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Posts: 5438
2009-10-28
#3
Quote: Originally posted by salvador on October-27-2009
2. I would like you to tell me please, if these steps I do to shoot, are ok, :

a. I prepare the rotator, level tripod etc.

b. Position the camera in front of the object

c. I turn the Camera Control dial up and down in order to find the correct exposure, For example, today was a very sunny day, and the first image (0 degree) was
shoot, the Av , changed in the 3 images I shoot, Im getting guide through the " exposure level indicator" I always try to keep a (green line ) in the middle
because, too much up or down get red, and I think it is why it get overexposed.

I now found that my camera has a * AE lock button, that the manual says that this is button is effective when the contrast is too strong between the
subject and background or when a subject is backlit.

By other side: the manual also says:

pressing the shutter button halfway and pressing the * AE lock button, will lock the exposure setting.

Thanks



First you need to meter for the "average" light of the scene. You may need to test expose in multiple positions around the 360 degrees and then take the average.

You do NOT shoot in any mode other than full manual (M) with manual selected ISO and manual selected White Balance. If you do this everything is manual making the "Exposure Lock" redundant and not required.

If there are great exposure differences between positions then this will time to learn "Exposure Fusing" from bracketed shots of the same position.

Regards, Smooth