panorama software,virtual tour software
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Joined: 2002-10-15
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2002-10-15
#1

three fisheyes

Hi, would it not make a LOT of sense for Easypano to stich three fisheye images? as per most other stichers.... It is VERY tough to take two perfectly aligned fisheye images when up a ladder - also, three images would allow more margin for error when using a monopod as a central point.
Any comments?
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Joined: 2002-06-12
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2002-10-15
#2

Hmmm difficult series of questions to answer.

Sitching images is ONLY the 2nd phase of the process.

1st phase- you have to use the proper nodal point, keep the camera and lens absolutely level in each of the 3 image.  [taking pictures from a ladder requires extra platform support]

2nd phase- assuming that you have taken 3 superior images that are over the nodal point and absolutely level, stitch the three images together, by having more overlap (say 30%) between the adjacent images allows the stitching software to locate MORE common reference points or ERR reduction. 

Taking only 2 pictures allows only 3 degrees [not much area] of overlap between shots, hence the probability of more mismatched ERR's.

3rd phase- it is nearly impossible to have an absolutely ERR free image, so general image clean up is necessary before releasing the panoramas to the client.

For a viewer demo of a 3 shot image please visit:

http://360texas.com/tips/rd/grid/grid.htm

Just a thought on the matter.

Dave


/s/
Dave
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EasyPano - Panoweaver
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Joined: 2002-10-15
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2002-10-15
#3
Thanks Dave,
your site is excellent and very informative - I CAN do the stiching by flattening the fisheye images first and then using free apple tools to stich them together and then retouch in Pshop, however I am looking for an easy stitch option to save flattening etc. first - I realise that I will have to retouch afterwards - I have done quite a few of these things from untethered boats etc, so I am used to dealing with a bit of movement - you can see some examples of mine at http://www.thearchitecturalphotographer.com

all the best
Matt