panorama software,virtual tour software
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Joined: 2008-02-05
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2008-02-05
#12

I mean, is this like that commercial (hope you saw it) about a software guy sitting down at a table with his client. The client is looking at this fellow's laptop screen. Then the TV jumps to the laptop screen and we have an "avatar" (an animated character) representing the software guy walking around on his little island with a single palm tree. The software fellow extolls (on the atoll) the marvelous technology he can manipulate but when the client asks him if his avatar can make any money, the software fellow remarks, "real or virtual money". The response is REAL.

"No, my avatar hasn't figured out how to do that yet."

Well, my question again, most fundamentally as possible, "Has anybody here figured out how to apply Easypano exclusive of other photographic ventures to either real estate or tourism or both? Because I am suspicious that we are realtors here who use the product to assist our own listings, assisting ourselves to sell properties by providing an additional service. Or panography is one tiny piece in an array of photographic solutions for which we advertise.

If the latter is true, then I suspect the need to build a larger organization where I become a full service photography virtual studio. My Canon GL1 w/ cordless mikes would need to become more than a lightweight shallow hobby.  

I have a Canon Rebel with a conventional zoom which will either need a wide angle or fisheye or both. I think I know what I need and how much to spend.

But you see, it was all the rage years ago to do digital video in weddings but developing a web site and advertise didn't make money there.

Fool me once.....

 


Robin
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2008-02-05
#13

People make money from Virtual Tours for sure. Is there a script for you to make money? No. It comes down to many things: Skill, Equipment, Sales Skills, Personality and Persistence.

Never seen the advert you speak of but as I'm in Australia and Easypano in China and most users from all parts of the world that is understandable. Sounds like a good advert that someone has put plenty of money into hoping for a return.

Anyway, if you keen to give it a shot - use the FREE trial downloads, learn the product & test your market and marketing skills before parting with your green backs.

If you are polite they are many users on these forums who could offer a helping hand in certain areas as you progress.

Regards, Smooth

 


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2008-02-06
#14
I have been self-employed for 3 years now - The majority of what I do is real estate virtual tours and floor plans. The US housing market is in a bit of a slump which is a good thing for virtual tour producers as the slow market pushes more agents into trying us out - Once they try us out we treat the right and provide the highest quality tours available in the area. There is a lot of money to be made outside of real estate. For the commercial end of things (hotels, resorts) you need to keep your prices right - and price them high. Call local photographers and get their pricing for standard still photography of a commercial location (say a couple still photos for a brochure) - They will likely be around $300-500 per still. If that's the case, you need to remind your prospects that this is much better than a single still photos and your need your prices in the same or a higher price range. Now for those who may give you repeat business (RV dealers or luxury boat dealers) you will want to provide them with a lower fee to get their business. Why in the world some virtual tour providers shoot commercial tours for about the same price as they would a house (around $150) is beyond my understanding - Commercial clients can afford much more and will take you more seriously.

With that said, you need to make sure your photography skills match your service fees. You need to provide high quality images if you want your product to be valuable to commercial clients. Hope this helps you. I think that most of the people out their who shoot virtual tours do it as a hobby or a side job here and there - I can assure you that you can make a living doing this, but it is a business just like any other business - You need a plan and you have to be about sell and market yourself. Personally I think your marketing skills are more important than your product - You can sell anything with a good marketing plan (look at the guy who started selling the 'Pet Rock' or the worst tasting yet most popular fast food joint, McDonald's) - it's all about the marketing.
Will Best
Virtual Impressions Inc.
Real Estate Virtual Tours and Floor Plans
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2008-02-06
#15
it's taken me awhile, but I am slowly starting to make some money at this. The previous poster is right, commercial clients pay much more. I tend to target those who have already made some kind of commitment to their own marketing. I've hooked up with a company that creates websites for the commercial real estate industry. Their clients have marketing budgets and don't blink when I mention price.

In a couple of weeks, I'll be at a networking event that promotes technology to commercial real estate professionals. I was invited as a featured vendor. I got this gig through a relationship that I've been developing over a period of almost two years (providing freelance creative services).

I think you can make money for sure. Although my focus is virtual tours, I realize that I have a better shot if I can come into a job through another means -- i.e. web design, traditional photography, graphic design, etc.

So far, I've avoided residential real estate like the plague. I cannot figure out how to make any money selling tours for only about $125.00 US (which is what many in my area are paying). Plus, I have found that I can focus on doing 5 or 6 really nice tours per month rather than 100+ crappy ones -- and still make a decent earning.

Take a look at the prices this company charges and ask yourself, "Can I do something similar?":

www.virtually-anywhere.com
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2008-02-11
#16

Now that is helpful, thank you.

But, if I am going to spend another grand on the hardware that I need, Getting the suite and support makes sense as well.

So, I had been considering working the high end residential real estate market but even there my suspisions are confirmed emarts. I am beside myself wondering why the most prestiguious real estate agency networks in America would use online slide shows of a dozen pictures to try to sell an estate worth $5 million? Then I am left to think: what does it matter why? If the horse don't wanna drink at the trough, forget about the horse. I just doesn't pay to unscramble it. Emarts. appreciate it.

So, you aren't going directly after the accounts, but instead you are going after successful local commercial website developers? You then are notified of their client (a new strip mall) who in the developer's opinion could use tours to fullfill this or that piece of the message in leasing/selling the business units. You are recommended by the web developers. Given the quality of the work you can demonstrate and interpreting the number of scenes they identify, you determine hours including post processing. Given the spectacular gratus work I did independently, they don't blink at my price.

Now, Emarts, here on the Big Island of Hawaii, let's say I begin small and I eventually approach a tourist related helicopter service through their website developer who sees the value of my panoramas at their place of business and some of their remote locations. I figure 6 hours on the shoot for pans and stills and two hours post production, given what they have told me.

How do I package and price?

I hope I interpreted you correctly.


Robin
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2008-02-11
#17

To my knowledge there are 3 major ways people make a living of virtual tours.

1) Real estate

Here you might consider taking a look at www.vizmark.co.za who target high end realtors in ZA

2) Tourist sites

I know a few guys who have set up a turist site applying Google Maps or similar and then sell tours the businesses in the local community. One is Garry @ http://www.explorenewarkandsherwood.co.uk/  and there is Ariel @ http://www.visitarosario.com/ 

3) Commercial

And then there are a lot of people (like my self) that have a much broader target group ranging from hotels and restaurants to specialty stores. Besides my own company www.wideeyes.dk it is worth mentioning www.newspin360.com The CEO - Mike - is a great salesman and that is one of the most important qualities to make a living from virtual tours.

Best regards

Morten

 


Best regards

Morten Andersen
- a newbie trying to improve
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2008-02-11
#18
I don't sell packages as I try to market each tour as a custom application. However, I do educate the client and tell them that the average tour has X amount of scenes and X amount of stills. I also try to get them to commit to high-end tours from the beginning so that they are expecting a higher price.

Most of the work that I do, however is in combination with Web Design/Development so the final price tag is much higher than just a simple tour. Also, I try to capture all of their marketing. so I'm providing print services too. I, in essence, market myself as a full-service graphic design firm.

As far as pricing for Virtual Tours, I set a price for shooting and a separate price for production (There's also a separate price for any design -- which there usually is). Shooting is usually the same for any project (except travel expenses). I charge a day rate regardless of how many hours it takes to shoot. I'm usually at a location for about 4 hours and I take about 150 - 200 shots (including stills). I'll then cull the images down to about 20 and show these to the customer. Once the images are chosen, the production begins.

Any shots added above what was contracted for will be additional cost. Client knows that up front when I provided the estimate prior to shooting.

Here's an example of an early site I worked on (disclaimer: had to conform to a previous design): www.windsorparknj.com


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2008-02-11
#19
Oh, BTW, I do go directly after account. I just started out by targeting my current customers. I happened to work with a company whose clients were commercial real estate. I was making CD-ROM and laptop presentations for them. When I began shooting VTs, I thought they were a good place to start. And they were.

Besides, Commercial Real Estate, I've shot for a funeral home, Apartment Buildings, a kitchen remodeling company, and an oil manufacturing company.
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2008-02-11
#20

Emart,

I'm going to have a hard time marketing myself as a full service media company.

I have practical experience with digital video through Premier as an event videographer/photographer. What would be the best company for the paper products you are describing....or would you describe yourself as an artist? Or, do you come off like an artist? Are you creating original work for stationary?

You give me courage.


Robin